Category — Human Resources

Global Technology Firms Increase Workforce in India

U.S.-based firms Microsoft, LinkedIn, Oracle, Facebook, and Google are increasing their engineering staff in India. These companies are seeking engineers from India to work on technologies similar to their global counterparts to build competence in niche technology areas.

A report from Washington-DC based Bain & Company published last month said global in-house centers (GICs) in India will play a bigger role for enterprises. “Indian GICs will play a more active role in driving top-of-mind investment priorities of global C-level executives at Fortune 1,000 companies in the next three to five years. In addition, more senior leaders of the enterprise, particularly those two levels below CEOs, will operate out of Indian GICs over this period,” the report added.

North Carolina-based Lowe’s, that has 1,000 employees in India, said its IT and analytics capabilities in the country will amplify its growth strategy.

“We are hiring people in e-commerce and digital technologies, retail and supply chain technologies, core engineering and infrastructure such as networking, virtual infrastructure and containerization, analytics and big data, and project management,” said James Brandt, managing director, Lowe’s India.

Target India, which has a current headcount of 2,500, will hire professionals in technology and areas such as marketing, supply chain and animation, reports SmartInvestor.

“We will hire talent with Java and Open Source capabilities and  for niche areas with expertise in machine learning and neuro-linguistic programming. In addition to technology, India has a talent pool in computer-generated imagery and animation. Our marketing team is looking to expand our CGI capabilities and tap this pool,” said Shalini Natraj, head of HR at Target India.

Human Resource elements

June 5, 2017   No Comments

Digital Trends among Urban Youngsters in India

The ways in which India’s urban Gen Z, people born after 1995, engage with the opportunities of the digital age is changing according to a recent youth survey released by Mumbai-based IT company, Tata Consultancy Services.

TCS conducted its Gen Z Survey 2016-17, across 15  Indian cities.

Indian youngster

Listed below are some of the key findings:

Shopping – Online shopping is the preferred mode of buying goods where around 84 percent, that is at least 8 out of every 10 teenagers, in Mumbai shop online.

Paying Bills – Cash-on-Delivery is the payment method of choice either using parents’ money (65 percent) or their own “pocket money” (40 percent).

Socializing – Facebook’s popularity is eroding, while Instagram users are rising. 13-year-old Vriddhi Gala says, “Instagram is more precise and totally for smartphone users. It is more creative than Facebook. My classmates use Instagram to share pictures and even moods.” 26 percent respondents said that they did not have a social media account. 13 percent said they had to delete their accounts due to pressure from parents and Aadhya Srinivas (15), said that many of her friends had created social accounts with fake names to encounter this pressure.

Communicating – E-mails are now replaced by WhatsApp (88%), Facebook Messenger (60%), Snapchat (41%), Google Hangout (36%) and Hike messenger (35%).

Using Internet – Out of a batch of 700 participants in one of the cities surveyed, 74 % used the Internet for completing school assignments, 69% used it for instant messaging, 67% used it for downloading games/music, and 60% said they played games on the Internet.

Owning Electronic Items – smartphones (79 percent), laptops/desktops/tablets (39 percent), gaming consoles (32 percent), e-book readers (27 percent), smartwatches (21 percent), activity tracker/fitness bands (17 percent) and virtual reality headsets (15 percent) are quickly gaining popularity among young Mumbaikars, reports the Indian Express.

 

May 28, 2017   No Comments

9 U.S. Companies among Top 25 Best Workplaces in India

Based on LinkedIn‘s study of actions, nine American companies are listed among the 25 most desirable companies for employees in India.

Logo of Linked in's Top Companies Where India Wants to Work

At #2 is Amazon: With more than 10,000 employees in India Amazon is rapidly expanding its Prime Video offerings in the country, investing $5 billion in 2016 with plans to double that investment in 2017.

At #3 is KPMG India: This firm operates in 152 countries worldwide. KPMG India has offices in Chandigarh, Gurgaon, Noida, Ahmedabad, Vadodara, Mumbai, Pune, Bangalore, Kochi, Chennai, Hyderabad and Kolkata.

At #7 is Adobe: India is a key innovation hub for Adobe – its biggest R&D location outside of its headquarters. Nearly 30 percent of the company’s research and development is centered in India. “We have probably grown faster in India than anywhere else in the world,” says CEO Shantanu Narayen.

At #8 is Google: The ability to download maps or YouTube clips for offline access, started in India before going global.

At #12 is Accenture: With 140,000 employees in India, Accenture recently opened a new Cyber Center in Bangalore, where clients, Accenture specialists and other industry experts from universities and beyond can uncover the next generation of security solutions and outpace cyber adversaries.

At #13 is Deloitte: In India, Deloitte offers a range of Audit, Risk Advisory, Tax, Consulting and Financial Advisory services across thirteen cities.

At #16 is Cisco: Cisco is moving beyond its core router and switching business into subscription sales and other sources of recurring revenue. These plans require robust hiring.

At #24 is McKinsey & Company: The company’s insights cover many topics from how India’s largest private bank fosters gender equality, to the state of the country’s private equity sector. More than 70 McKinsey India alumni have become CEOs.

At #25 is Oracle: The company has set up nine incubation centers to contribute to India’s booming startup culture and trains 500,000 students every year through the company’s education program.

 

 

May 21, 2017   No Comments

Indians Attracted to Western Employers the Most

The Netherlands-headquartered Randstad Group released its  Employer Brand Research 2017 the world’s largest public opinion survey on employer branding. In India this year, the research captured the views of 3,500 respondents.

According to the survey results, Google India, has been named as India’s most ‘attractive employer brand’,  followed by Mercedes–Benz India. Sector specific winners are Amazon India for e-Commerce, ITC Limited for FMCG and Philips India for Consumer and Healthcare.

A lady at work in an office

Salary and employee benefits continue to be the top driver among the Indian workforce across all
profiles while choosing an employer, quotes SmartInvestor. This is followed by good work-life balance and job security. The survey also highlights that the Indian workforce prefers to work for companies operating in sectors such as IT (65%), followed by BFSI (63%) and retail & FMCG (62%).

 

May 5, 2017   No Comments

India Streamlines Regulations for Clinical Research

With the aim of creating a conducive environment that fosters research and new drug development in India, the government has amended some critical clauses and framed new guidelines that are aligned to global regulations.
In an interview with BioSpectrum Asia Magazine, Suneela Thatte, president, Indian Society for Clinical Research said that India now has a very robust regulatory environment which is focused on quality, and where patient safety and confidentiality is not compromised.
“The compensation guidelines for clinical research are now more balanced and rational, and formulae have been introduced by the regulators for calculating the financial compensation based on a no-fault principle. This not only provides ease of implementation and consistency but also helps the sponsor of the trial to understand the maximum possible liability and plan appropriately while protecting the patient well being,” she said.
Clinical Trials

Restrictions on the number of clinical trials an investigator could do at a given point in time, and the minimum number of beds a clinical trial site needed to have, have been removed.Thatte added, “We hope the new regulatory environment will encourage more innovative and path-breaking R&D in our local biopharma companies as also in many of our well established teaching and academic institutions.

September 22, 2016   No Comments