Coca-Cola Brings its ‘Fruit Circular Economy’ Concept to India

Atlanta-based Coca-Cola, its bottling partners, fruit suppliers, and processors in India, will invest $1.7 billion in India’s agricultural ecosystem over the next 5 years, according to the company. The company’s Fruit Circular Economy concept will span the entire supply chain from fruit orchards to the final product. “The investments announced today by Coca-Cola will further catalyze economic growth and create new opportunities for farmers and local suppliers,” said T. Krishnakumar, president, Coca-Cola India and Southwest Asia

Mango orchard

$800 million will be reserved for procuring fruit pulp and fruit concentrate for the company’s juice and juice drinks and carbonated drinks with juice products. The remaining will be invested on manufacturing lines, bottling infrastructure, fruit processing plants and equipment, and agriculture interventions that facilitate sustainable agriculture. Coca-Cola’s technology and production methods will conserve soil, water, energy and biological resources, reports the Business Standard. The company says that over 200,000 farmers will benefit from this plan of sourcing fruit pulp and fruit concentrate out of 2.10 million tons of fruit.

The company also procures and exports raw materials and ingredients worth $280 million from India to 44 countries.

 

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Posted on by Gunjan Bagla
Gunjan Bagla
California-based management consultant Gunjan Bagla runs Amritt, a consulting firm helping American companies to succeed in India. Amritt is the trusted advisor for India market research, India business development, India market entry, Global Engineering, Global Technology Scouting, India R&D and Open Innovation. Gunjan is author of "Business in 21st Century India: How to Profit Today from Tomorrow’s Most Exciting Market" (Hachette Book Group, 2008), Amazon's top rated title on the subject. He has appeared as the India Expert on BBC Television, Bloomberg TV, Fox Cable Business and has been quoted in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Hollywood Reporter and Business Week for his expertise on India.

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