India’s Institute of Technology Develops Cardio Implant

The Indian Institute of Technology Madras located in Chennai, India has developed Asia’s first ‘life-saving’ implant called SynkroScaff — A tissue engineered bovine pericardial patch — for critical cardiovascular patients. A Chennai-based firm, SynkroMax Biotech, has been appointed as the commercial partner. C.V. Seshadri, managing director of Synkromax Biotech said, “This sack is harvested and processed with biomaterial for ten days followed by quality control parameters to ensure it is microbial free.”

Tissue Engineering

The  pericardial patch (sack of buffalo’s heart) has inherent properties of regeneration and integration in the body, and its medical application is based on innovator Guhathakurta’s doctoral research in the institute in 2004, under the guidance of Venkatesh Balasubramanian, professor, Department of Engineering Design. Guhathakurta says, “Its applications are immense in cardiovascular and other surgical practices.  So far, 800 patches have been manufactured and over 12 surgeons are using them across India.  The feedback from doctors and patients has been encouraging, with a 100 percent success rate,” she said, adding that the product is manufactured in a facility complying with drug applications and current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) guidelines, reports the New Indian Express.

 

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Posted on by Gunjan Bagla
Gunjan Bagla
California-based management consultant Gunjan Bagla runs Amritt, a consulting firm helping American companies to succeed in India. Amritt is the trusted advisor for India market research, India business development, India market entry, Global Engineering, Global Technology Scouting, India R&D and Open Innovation. Gunjan is author of "Business in 21st Century India: How to Profit Today from Tomorrow’s Most Exciting Market" (Hachette Book Group, 2008), Amazon's top rated title on the subject. He has appeared as the India Expert on BBC Television, Bloomberg TV, Fox Cable Business and has been quoted in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Hollywood Reporter and Business Week for his expertise on India.

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