India’s Scientists Create Artificial Leaf that Produces Energy

Scientists at state-owned National Chemical Laboratory in Pune, a city 90 miles east of Mumbai, India, have developed an artificial leaf that generates hydrogen.

The device consists of semiconductors stacked in a manner to simulate the natural leaf system. When light strikes the semiconductors, electrons move in one direction, and the ultra-thin wireless device mimics plant leaves to produce energy using water and sunlight.

a leaf

Chinnakonda S. Gopinath, a senior scientist at the laboratory said his team has been working for nearly a decade to split water molecules in order to generate hydrogen in this manner. “We have made an attempt to generate solar hydrogen. The method is simple and practical and there is a good possibility of scaling it up,” he said. The research, published in the journal Scientific Reports, says a palm-sized device can produce 6.3 quarts of hydrogen fuel an hour, reports NDTV. More work is needed on the project, added the scientist.

 

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Posted on by Gunjan Bagla
Gunjan Bagla
California-based management consultant Gunjan Bagla runs Amritt, a consulting firm helping American companies to succeed in India. Amritt is the trusted advisor for India market research, India business development, India market entry, Global Engineering, Global Technology Scouting, India R&D and Open Innovation. Gunjan is author of "Business in 21st Century India: How to Profit Today from Tomorrow’s Most Exciting Market" (Hachette Book Group, 2008), Amazon's top rated title on the subject. He has appeared as the India Expert on BBC Television, Bloomberg TV, Fox Cable Business and has been quoted in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Hollywood Reporter and Business Week for his expertise on India.

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