India’s Shrimp Industry Shows Steady Growth

India’s export of shrimp was 382,959 tons in Calendar Year 2015, up 9.8 percent from the previous year
India’s cultured shrimp production in the year ending March 2015 was about 426,500 tons, up 30 percent from the previous year (Figure 1). From  2005  to 2015, shrimp production has grown at a compound annual growth rate of 13 percent.
Fig 1. Cultured Shrimp Production Rising

Fig 1. Cultured Shrimp Production Rising

The introduction of white leg shrimp (Litopenaeus Vannamei, or Vannamei) in 2009 spurred growth in shrimp production during the last few years and displaced sales of the other major shrimp species such as the tiger shrimp (Penaeus Monodon) which was found to be susceptible to disease. In FY 2015, the production of the white leg shrimp (Vannamei species) rose to  353,000 tons, which was 81 percent of the total shrimp production in India. This species is preferred since it has a fast growth rate, is disease resistant, needs lower feed requirements, and exhibits a higher survival rate.  In 2015, the area under shrimp production in brackish water aquaculture was 121,600 hectares, which was up from 102,500 hectares in 2010. Industry sources indicate that shrimp production accounts for 25 percent of the brackish water aquaculture.
Accounting for 65 percent of the total shrimp produced in India, the state of Andhra Pradesh is India’s largest cultured shrimp producer. This is followed by West Bengal, Tamil Nadu & Puducherry (earlier known as Pondicherry), Gujarat, and Odisha. Tiger shrimp (Penaeus Monodon) are farmed in the states of West Bengal, Odisha and Kerala, while the Vannamei species is preferred in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Tamil Nadu and Odisha.
Although most of India’s shrimp production is exported, its broodstock is imported. According to industry sources, India imports 98 percent of total broodstock specific-pathogen-free (SPF) Vannamei broodstock from U.S.A., and in Calendar Year 2015 import of broodstock from the U.S. reached $10.8 million  In addition to broodstock, Artemia Cysts, which are used as live feed during the larvae raising operations in shrimp hatcheries, are imported as well. In CY 2015, 97 percent of India’s Artemia Cysts worth $15.44 million were imported from the United States, says a GAIN report.
Be Sociable, Share!
Posted on by Gunjan Bagla
Gunjan Bagla
California-based management consultant Gunjan Bagla runs Amritt, a consulting firm helping American companies to succeed in India. Amritt is the trusted advisor for India market research, India business development, India market entry, Global Engineering, Global Technology Scouting, India R&D and Open Innovation. Gunjan is author of "Business in 21st Century India: How to Profit Today from Tomorrow’s Most Exciting Market" (Hachette Book Group, 2008), Amazon's top rated title on the subject. He has appeared as the India Expert on BBC Television, Bloomberg TV, Fox Cable Business and has been quoted in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Hollywood Reporter and Business Week for his expertise on India.

0 comments

There are no comments yet...

Kick things off by filling out the form below.

Leave a Comment

*