Scientists in India Create Sensor to Detect Bacteria Quickly

Working in collaboration with the Photonics Research Center at the University of Quebec in Outaouais, scientists from the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, have built a sensor that can detect the presence of Escherichia coli in food and water in under 20 minutes, much faster than traditional laboratory tests.

Bacteria

Bacteriophages used in the device bond to the surface of an optical fiber, grab E.coli bacteria from a sample, and keep them attached. When a beam of light strikes the surface, the presence of E.coli shifts the wavelength in a telltale sign of bacterial contamination. An additional optical component cancels out temperature-induced shifts, reports the Economic Times. By changing the bacteriophage in the sensor, other strains of bacteria can also be detected, the scientists report.

The team members that worked on this project are Krishnendu Dandapat, Saurabh Mani Tripathi, Yasser Chinifooroshan, Wojtek J. Bock, and Predrag Mikulic.

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Posted on by Gunjan Bagla
Gunjan Bagla
California-based management consultant Gunjan Bagla runs Amritt, a consulting firm helping American companies to succeed in India. Amritt is the trusted advisor for India market research, India business development, India market entry, Global Engineering, Global Technology Scouting, India R&D and Open Innovation. Gunjan is author of "Business in 21st Century India: How to Profit Today from Tomorrow’s Most Exciting Market" (Hachette Book Group, 2008), Amazon's top rated title on the subject. He has appeared as the India Expert on BBC Television, Bloomberg TV, Fox Cable Business and has been quoted in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Hollywood Reporter and Business Week for his expertise on India.

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